Maluw Adhil Urngu Padanu Mamuy Moesik (Legends from the deep sitting peacefully on the waters)
  • Hanna Tuulikki, 'Seals’kin' (video still), 2022. Single channel moving image and stereo sound, 19:14 mins. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Casino Wake Up Time, 'Slumber Party', 2022. Four antique beds, Australian native plants (buchie rush, bullrush, bracken fern, lomandra, eucalyptus, grass), weeds (umbrella sedge, setaria), terracotta clay, jute string, paper wire twist ties, second hand denim pants, skirts and shorts, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artists. Image: Joe Ruckli.

  • Zheng Bo, 'Pteridophilia', 2016–ongoing. Digital video, colour, sound. . Courtesy the artist and Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Uncle Ray Woods and Bernard Sullivan, 'Galari-dyi Bangamalagi – Sharing the Lachlan', 2021. Digital video, colour, sound, 15:00 mins. duration: 15:00 minutes. Courtesy the artists. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Duke Riley, 'The View From The Mouth Of The Newtown Creek During Final Days of Battle', 2022; and 'Runes of Ruin', 2022. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Clare Milledge, 'Imbás: a well at the bottom of the sea', 2022. Silk hangings, suspended copper cauldrons; Ahimsa (peace) silk, handdyed with natural fermented indigo, reused textiles, metal and wood, reused copper cauldrons, new and reused climbing rope and hardware, reused artworks (wax, pigment, fabric, ink, timber, seeds, resin, insect exoskeletons), reclaimed Eucalyptus oreades, oil, sound. Courtesy the artist and STATION. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Clare Milledge, 'Imbás: a well at the bottom of the sea', 2022. Silk hangings, suspended copper cauldrons; Ahimsa (peace) silk, handdyed with natural fermented indigo, reused textiles, metal and wood, reused copper cauldrons, new and reused climbing rope and hardware, reused artworks (wax, pigment, fabric, ink, timber, seeds, resin, insect exoskeletons), reclaimed Eucalyptus oreades, oil, sound. Courtesy the artist and STATION. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Marjetica Potrč, 'The Rights of a River', 2021; and 'The Life of the Lachlan River', 2022. 20 works, ink on paper (framed). Courtesy the artist & Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin/Stockholm/Mexico City. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Foreground: Jessie French, 'The Myth of Nature – agaG1 (V2)', 2022. Background: Marjetica Potrč, 'The Time of Humans on the Soča River', 2021; 'The Life of the Lachlan River', 2022; and 'The Time on the Lachlan River', 2022. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

  • Foreground: Yessie Mosby, 'Maluw Adhil Urngu Padanu Mamuy Moesik (Legends from the deep sitting, peacefully upon the waters)', 2022. Background: Dylan Mooney, 'Our Islands Our Home campaign posters, 2022. Photo: Joe Ruckli.

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Maluw Adhil Urngu Padanu Mamuy Moesik (Legends from the deep sitting peacefully on the waters)

Selected works from the 23rd Biennale of Sydney: rīvus

28 January–29 April 202328 Jan–29 Apr 2023

The Institute of Modern Art has collaborated with the Biennale of Sydney to commission a new work from the Torres Strait 8, a collective on the frontlines of advocacy for the climate crisis in Zenadh Kes (the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding seas). Led by Yessie Mosby, a Kulkalgal Traditional Owner and member of the group, Torres Strait 8 present a hybrid art-as-protest piece featuring campaign materials created as part of the Our Islands Our Home campaign. Yessie Mosby and the Torres Strait 8’s participation in the Biennale and IMA project will continue to magnify the campaign fighting for justice for the communities of Zenadh Kes in holding the Australian Government accountable on climate change policy.

This commission will form the anchor for a broader curation of select works from the 23rd Biennale of Sydney: rīvus that speak to our enduring connections and responsibilities to the natural world. Through the exhibited work, Maluw Adhil Urngu Padanu Mamuy Moesik (Legends from the deep sitting peacefully on the waters) will explore how these potential relationships might decentre the human, prioritise care for Country, and pursue justice in an epoch of rising temperatures and seas.

This partnership is part of the Casiquiare | Biennale of Sydney new national collaboration project, which involves collaborating with leading cultural institutions across Australia, presenting co-commissioned artworks in the Biennale of Sydney and, separately, in unique curated shows at institutions across Australia.

Artists

Zheng Bo, Casino Wake Up Time, Jessie French, Clare Milledge, Marjetica Potrč with Ray Woods, Duke Riley, Torres Strait 8, and Hanna Tuulikki

Artist Bios
Zheng Bo

Through drawing, dance and film, Zheng Bo cultivates intimate relations with plants. These relations are aesthetic, erotic, and political. For them art does not arise from human creativity, but more-than-human vibrancy. In 2022 they presented a new forest dance film titled Le Sacre du printemps (Tandvärkstallen) at the 59th Venice Biennale. Zheng Bo grew up in Beijing and now lives on Lantau Island, Hong Kong. Guided by Daoist wisdom, they grow weedy gardens, living slogans, ecoqueer films, and ecosocialist workshops. These diverse projects, alive and entangled, constitute a garden where they collaborate with both human and nonhuman thinkers and activists. Their ecological art practice contributes to an emergent planetary indigeneity.

Casino Wake Up Time

Casino Wake Up Time is a collective of Bundjalung and Kamilaroi women who have been meeting and weaving for over ten years. Established in 2006 in Casino, Australia, members Auntie Janelle Duncan, Auntie Margaret Torrens, Theresa Bolt and Kylie Caldwell are leading NSW Aboriginal contemporary weaving into new and abstract forms. Meeting to share stories, learn traditional crafts and make intricate pieces, sharing skills has been a way of renewing culture for the collective. The artists have held several exhibitions locally as well as showing at Boomalli Gallery, Sydney and have conducted numerous workshops locally, regionally, and nationally.

Casino Wake Up Time is a collective of Bundjalung and Kamilaroi women who have been meeting and weaving for over ten years. Established in 2006 in Casino, Australia, members Auntie Janelle Duncan, Auntie Margaret Torrens, Theresa Bolt and Kylie Caldwell are leading NSW Aboriginal contemporary weaving into new and abstract forms. Meeting to share stories, learn traditional crafts and make intricate pieces, sharing skills has been a way of renewing culture for the collective. The artists have held several exhibitions locally as well as showing at Boomalli Gallery, Sydney and have conducted numerous workshops locally, regionally, and nationally.

Casino Wake Up Time
Jessie French

Jessie French explores speculative futures through algae-based bioplastic and water-based ecologies. Housed within an ethos of consumption, sustainability and regeneration, her practice invites others to engage with the possibilities of a post-petrochemical world. Through experimenting with other materials, she explores the potential of closed-loop systems of (re)use and conscious consumption and interaction with objects. In 2020, Jessie founded OTHER MATTER, an experimental design studio working with algae-based bioplastics which engages others in the possibilities of new materials though objects, experiences and futures.

Clare Milledge

Clare Milledge lives in Bundjalung Country (Broken Head, Australia) on the lands of the Arakwal people, and the Eora Nation (Paddington, Australia) on the lands of the Bidjigal and Gadigal people. Clare’s work re-examines contemporary environments with a focus on our engagement with ecology through art, in particular through the use of the historical figure of the artist-shaman. Working with fieldwork as her primary methodology she collects, re-organises, transforms and re-presents recordings, information and material gathered on ecological surveys and site visits. Her research output takes the form of public installation environments that variously incorporate glass paintings, textile works, costumes, sets, collaborative experimental sound and performance.

Clare Milledge lives in Bundjalung Country (Broken Head, Australia) on the lands of the Arakwal people, and the Eora Nation (Paddington, Australia) on the lands of the Bidjigal and Gadigal people. Clare’s work re-examines contemporary environments with a focus on our engagement with ecology through art, in particular through the use of the historical figure of the artist-shaman. Working with fieldwork as her primary methodology she collects, re-organises, transforms and re-presents recordings, information and material gathered on ecological surveys and site visits. Her research output takes the form of public installation environments that variously incorporate glass paintings, textile works, costumes, sets, collaborative experimental sound and performance.

Clare Milledge
Marjetica Potrč

Marjetica Potrč is an artist and architect based in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Marjetica’s practice includes drawing series, architectural case studies and public art projects. Her on-site projects are characterised by participatory design and a concern with sustainable solutions. These projects often centre around infrastructure and resources such as water and soil. Her work emphasises individual and community empowerment, problem-solving tools, and strategies for the future that transcend neoliberal agreement and testify to the failures of Modernism.

Ray Woods

Ray Woods is a Wiradjuri man dedicated to caring for country, primarily the land and waters along the Murrumbidgee and Galari (Lachlan) Rivers around Hay. Ray’s practice is as a collaborative film maker working with Bernard Sullivan and others to create videos that share understanding about Country and his concerns for it. Previous collaborative projects include the film Yindyamarra Yambuwan and exhibitions at Wagga Art Gallery, Burambabirra Yindyamarra: Sharing Respect (2016) and Ngiyanggarang: Beginning a conversation in the morning to awaken others (2018).

Ray Woods is a Wiradjuri man dedicated to caring for country, primarily the land and waters along the Murrumbidgee and Galari (Lachlan) Rivers around Hay. Ray’s practice is as a collaborative film maker working with Bernard Sullivan and others to create videos that share understanding about Country and his concerns for it. Previous collaborative projects include the film Yindyamarra Yambuwan and exhibitions at Wagga Art Gallery, Burambabirra Yindyamarra: Sharing Respect (2016) and Ngiyanggarang: Beginning a conversation in the morning to awaken others (2018).

Ray Woods
Duke Riley

Duke Riley’s work addresses the tension between individual and collective behaviour, independent spaces within all-encompassing societies, and the conflict with institutional power. He examines transgression zones and their inhabitants through drawing, printmaking, mosaic, sculpture, performative interventions, infiltrations, and video structured as complex multimedia installations. Duke combines populist myths and historical obscurities with contemporary social and environmental dilemmas, connecting past and present, drawing attention to unsolved issues. Throughout his projects he profiles the space where water meets the land, traditionally marking the periphery of urban society, what lies beyond rigid moral constructs, a sense of danger and possibility.

Torres Strait 8

The Torres Strait 8 are a group of claimants and Traditional Owners from Zenadh Kes (Torres Strait Islands). The Torres Strait 8 have recently won their legal fight against the Australian government for its inaction over climate change before the Human Rights Committee of the United Nations. Formed in 2019, the Torres Strait 8’s members are Yessie Mosby, Masig (Yorke Island); Kabay Tamu, Warraber (Sue Island); Keith Pabai, Boigu (Boigu Island); Stanley Marama, Boigu (Boigu Island); Nazareth Warria, Masig (Yorke Island); Ted Billy, Warraber (Sue Island); Daniel Billy, Warraber (Sue Island); and Nazareth Fauid, Poruma (Coconut Island).

The Torres Strait 8 are a group of claimants and Traditional Owners from Zenadh Kes (Torres Strait Islands). The Torres Strait 8 have recently won their legal fight against the Australian government for its inaction over climate change before the Human Rights Committee of the United Nations. Formed in 2019, the Torres Strait 8’s members are Yessie Mosby, Masig (Yorke Island); Kabay Tamu, Warraber (Sue Island); Keith Pabai, Boigu (Boigu Island); Stanley Marama, Boigu (Boigu Island); Nazareth Warria, Masig (Yorke Island); Ted Billy, Warraber (Sue Island); Daniel Billy, Warraber (Sue Island); and Nazareth Fauid, Poruma (Coconut Island).

Torres Strait 8
Hanna Tuulikki

Hanna Tuulikki is a British-Finnish artist, composer and performer based in Glasgow, Scotland. Her practice spans performance and audio-visual installation, blending vocal music, choreography, costume and drawing. In her work, she investigates how the body communicates beyond and before words to tell stories through imitation, vocalisation and gesture. With a largely place-responsive process, she considers how bodily relationships and folk histories are encoded within specific environments, ecologies and places. Her recent work engages with what it means to live on a damaged planet, proposing contemporary queer ritual as a way to process the trauma that comes with ecological awareness.

Zenadh Kes

Zenadh Kes (the Torres Strait) is home to people who have lived with a deep connection to land, sea, sky and culture for over 60,000 years. The people of Zenadh Kes are on the front line of climate change with rising sea levels, increasing extreme weather events and coastal erosion affecting the 18 inhabited islands in the region and threatening many communities’ way of life and culture.

Zenadh Kes (the Torres Strait) is home to people who have lived with a deep connection to land, sea, sky and culture for over 60,000 years. The people of Zenadh Kes are on the front line of climate change with rising sea levels, increasing extreme weather events and coastal erosion affecting the 18 inhabited islands in the region and threatening many communities’ way of life and culture.

Zenadh Kes

The IMA acknowledges, thanks, and pays our deepest respect to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people that we work with and the Country we work on. 

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